Floor Insulation

Suspended Timber Floor Insulation
A typical suspended timber floor in an Edwardian hallway. Two floorboards have been lifted to expose the joists.

A typical suspended timber floor in an Edwardian hallway. Two floorboards have been lifted to expose the joists.

According to the National Energy Foundation, 10% of heat is lost through raised wooden floors.

We can reduce draughts and heat loss whilst complying with Building Regulations. As energy prices continue to rise, the insulation of these floors is becoming more and more important. Our surveys are free and place the homeowner under no obligation.

Insulating Victoria, Edwardian and pre-1970s homes

During the Victorian era and the inter-war period, huge building programmes across the country saw the construction of millions of houses. During the 1800’s most houses were brick built with a slate roof, whilst in the 1920’s and 1930’s the houses were made from brick, with a clay tile roof.

The ground floor of most of these homes are of a similar construction in that they are made from floorboards secured to joists with a small ventilated space under the joists.

This type of floor construction is called a “Suspended Timber Floor”.

Air bricks at the front, side or rear of the house allow air to flow under the floorboards. This keeps the joists and floor boards in good condition by preventing timber decay.

However, unlike modern built homes, there is no insulation installed into a Suspended Timber Floor. As cold air enters the space under the floor via the air bricks, it cools the floorboards and can even create a draught between the boards or at edges of the room adjacent to the skirting boards. This cooling effect on the floor has a negative impact on the heating costs of a home as householders turn up their thermostat to compensate.

Sapwell’s have developed methods of installing floor insulation into Victorian and Edwardian homes.

Today, there are approximately 6.5 million of these houses still in use, but at Sapwell’s we have developed methods of installing suspended floor insulation into these homes.

A section of the same hallway after the insulation material has been cut to size and installed.

A section of the same hallway after the insulation material has been cut to size and installed.

In some homes the gap under the floorboards can be as much as 1 metre deep. In others it can be as little as 25cm. Whatever the size of the gap underneath the floor, we have a technique for installing the floor insulation. If you have a cellar or a basement we can insulate the ceiling thereby keeping the room above warmer.

Before you refurbish your floorboards, lay a new carpet or solid wood floor, give us a call or drop us an email so that we can give you a quote for insulating your floor.